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A new car that is financed through a loan, the buyer has to pay for the first year and then can pay for it over time. If the car blows up during this time, would the lender have any recourse?

The financed car no longer working is a problem that can be faced by many people. This article will go over the steps to take in order to fix it.

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If you’re like most people, when your car dies you panic. You know that if you can’t get it fixed right away, the chances of it dying again and leaving you with a large debt are high. But what if there was a way to avoid this? What if there was a way to keep your car running even if the engine blows? Well, there is. And that’s why I’m writing about it here on Motor Blows Up On Financed Car.

Introduction

So your car has finally died and you still owe money on it. Now what? This situation is not as rare as you might think. In fact, about 1 in 9 Americans have a car loan, and about 1 in 8 of those people are behind on their payments. So what do you do when your car dies and you still owe money on it?

There are a few options available to you, but the best course of action will depend on your individual circumstances. Let’s take a look at some of the things you can do if your car dies and you still owe money on it.

Option 1: Voluntarily Surrender Your Car

If your car is no longer running and you can’t afford to repair it, one option is to voluntarily surrender the vehicle to the lender. This means that you give up ownership of the car and the lender takes possession of it. They may then sell the car at auction in order to recoup some of the money that you owe them.

Pros:

ufffd You no longer have to worry about making payments on a car that doesn’t run.

ufffd You may be able to negotiate with the lender for a deficiency judgment, which would forgive some or all of the remaining balance owed on the loan.

Cons:

ufffd Your credit score will take a hit because voluntary surrender is considered an act of default.

ufffd The lender may come after you for any deficiency balance (the amount left unpaid after they sell the car at auction).

Option 2: Keep The Car And Try To Sell It Yourself

Just because your car doesn’t run doesn’t mean it’s worthless! Even if it needs expensive repairs like a new engine or transmission, there may be someone out there who’s willing to pay cash for it “as is.” If you’re lucky enough to find such a buyer, selling your junker outright could be the best way to get rid of it while minimizing your losses.

Pros:

ufffd You won’t damage your credit score by voluntarily surrendering the vehicle since you’ll be selling it instead.

ufffd You may be able to sell it for more than its trade-in value, especially if parts from the engine or transmission can be reused .

Cons:

ufffd It can be difficult finding a buyer who’s willing to pay cash for a non-running vehicle .

ufffd If nobody buys your junker, you’ll still have to find a way to get rid of it eventually .

What to do when your car dies and you still owe money on it

If your car dies and you still owe money on it, the best thing to do is to try and sell the car for parts. You can also contact the lender that you have the loan with and see if they are willing to work with you on a payment plan or some other arrangement. If neither of those options are possible, then you may have to consider voluntarily surrendering the car.

Blown head gasket on financed car

If your car has a blown head gasket and you’re still making payments on it, you may be wondering what to do. First, it’s important to know that a blown head gasket is a serious issue and can cause extensive damage to your engine if not repaired promptly. If your car is still under warranty, you should take it to the dealership for repairs. However, if your car is no longer under warranty or you can’t afford the repairs, there are a few options available to you.

One option is to voluntarily surrender the car to the lender. This means that you return the vehicle and give up any ownership rights you have in it. The lender will then sell the car at auction and use the proceeds to pay off your loan balance. This option is typically only available if the value of the car is less than what you owe on it.

Another option is to sell the car yourself and use the proceeds to pay off your loan balance. This can be tricky if your car is not running well, but there are some buyers who are willing to purchase cars with mechanical issues. You could also try trading in your car for a new one; however, this may not be an option if you owe more money on your loan than what your car is worth.

If you’re struggling with what to do about a blown head gasket on a financed car, talk to your lender about all of your options. They may be ableto work with you to find a solution that works best for both parties involved.

Can you voluntarily surrender a car that doesn’t run

If your car has stopped working and you can’t afford to repair it, you may be wondering if you can simply surrender the vehicle to the lender. The short answer is yes, but there are a few things to keep in mind before taking this step.

First, voluntary surrender will not get rid of your obligation to repay the loan. The lender can still come after you for the money you owe, even if they no longer have possession of the car. They may even sue you or send your account to collections.

Second, surrendering your car will likely result in a negative mark on your credit report. This could make it difficult to finance another vehicle in the future.

Finally, keep in mind that most lenders require that you notify them ahead of time if you plan to surrender the car. So don’t just abandon it at their doorstep! If possible, try to work out an alternate arrangement with your lender, such as deferring payments or refinancing the loan.

Car is junk but I still owe money

If your car is junk but you still owe money on it, there are a few options available to you. You could try to sell the car and use the proceeds to pay off the loan. However, if the car is truly junk, it may be difficult to find a buyer. Another option is to voluntarily surrender the car to the lender. This means that you give up ownership of the vehicle and are no longer responsible for making payments on it. The lender may then sell the car in order to recoup some of their losses. Finally, you could try to repair the car yourself if it is not too expensive or difficult to do so. This option may be less desirable if you do not have the money or expertise needed to fix the problem.

Who buys cars with blown engines

If you’re looking to sell your car with a blown engine, there are a few options available to you. You can try and sell it privately, but it’s unlikely you’ll find many buyers willing to take on a car with such a major issue. Alternatively, you can trade it in at a dealership or sell it to a scrapyard or ‘cash for cars’ company.

Of course, if you still owe money on the car, things get a little more complicated. You’ll need to contact your lender and let them know what’s happened – they may be able to work out some kind of arrangement with you. If not, you’ll need to continue making payments on the car until it’s paid off, even though it’s now effectively worthless. Once the loan is repaid, you can then do whatever you like with the vehicle.

In short, if your car has blown its engine, don’t despair – there are still some options available to you. Just be aware that unless you’re able to pay off the remaining loan balance, you’ll still be liable for making repayments on a car that’s no longer roadworthy.

Conclusion

If your car dies and you still owe money on it, there are a few options available to you. You can try to sell the car privately, but depending on the severity of the issue (e.g. a blown engine), it may be difficult to find a buyer. You could also voluntary surrender the car to the lender, but this will likely damage your credit score. Another option is to junk the car and use the proceeds from the sale to pay off the loan, but you may still end up owing money if the car is worth less than what you owe. Ultimately, it’s best to consult with a professional before making any decisions about what to do with your deceased vehicle.

The “will insurance total my car for blown engine” is a question that many people have. If the engine of your car blows up, it will be covered by your auto insurance.

External References-

https://www.reddit.com/r/personalfinance/comments/dih37r/my_cars_engine_is_blown_and_i_owe_9k_on_the_loan/

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